Lifeguards and specialists from Sea World teamed up to rescue a baby dolphin that got itself tangled up in some fishing line in San Diego, Calif. NBC’s Lester Holt reports.

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“SANDWICH (CBS) – A dolphin off of Cape Cod apparently decided it was no match for seas that swelled to around 30 feet in the height of the 2013 blizzard.

While WBZ-TV crews were monitoring coastal conditions during the storm, some bystanders spotted the dolphin taking refuge, swimming in between some docks at the marina in Sandwich Harbor.

“This dolphin was just circling around, hanging around,” WBZ-TV reporter Christina Hager noted in her report.

Hager explained that the area where the dolphin was swimming is very protected from the wind and waves.

“The seas are too rough out there so he’s coming in where it’s just a little calmer and he can ride it out,” one of the locals pointed out.

The WBZ-TV crew also noted that they picked their particular live shot location in Sandwich Harbor because it was somewhat protected from the elements.”

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Lone dolphin with spinal deformity travels among a group of sperm whales.

By Linda Poon – National Geographic News

“In 2011, behavioral ecologists Alexander Wilson and Jens Krause of the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries in Germany were surprised to discover that a group of sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus)—animals not usually known for forging bonds with other species—had taken in an adult bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).”

“The researchers observed the group in the ocean surrounding the Azores (map)—about 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) off the coast of Lisbon, Portugal—for eight days as the dolphin traveled, foraged, and played with both the adult whales and their calves. When the dolphin rubbed its body against the whales, they would sometimes return the gesture.

Among terrestrial animals, cross-species interactions are not uncommon. These mostly temporary alliances are forged for foraging benefits and protection against predators, said Wilson.

They could also be satisfying a desire for the company of other animals, added marine biologist John Francis, vice president for research, conservation, and exploration at the National Geographic Society (the Society owns National Geographic News).

Photographs of dogs nursing tiger cubs, stories of a signing gorilla adopting a pet cat, and videos of a leopard caring for a baby baboon have long circulated the Web and caught national attention.

A Rare Alliance

And although dolphins are known for being sociable animals, Wilson called the alliance between sperm whale and bottlenose dolphin rare, as it has never, to his knowledge, been witnessed before.

This association may have started with something called bow riding, a common behavior among dolphins during which they ride the pressure waves generated by the bow of a ship or, in this case, whales, suggested Francis.

“Hanging around slower creatures to catch a ride might have been the first advantage [of such behavior],” he said, adding that this may have also started out as simply a playful encounter.

Wilson suggested that the dolphin’s peculiar spinal shape made it more likely to initiate an interaction with the large and slow-moving whales. “Perhaps it could not keep up with or was picked on by other members of its dolphin group,” he said in an email.

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But the “million-dollar question,” as Wilson puts it, is why the whales accepted the lone dolphin. Among several theories presented in an upcoming paper inAquatic Mammals describing the scientists’ observations, they propose that the dolphin may have been regarded as nonthreatening and that it was accepted by default because of the way adult sperm whales “babysit” their calves.

Sperm whales alternate their dives between group members, always leaving one adult near the surface to watch the juveniles. “What is likely is that the presence of the calves—which cannot dive very deep or for very long—allowed the dolphin to maintain contact with the group,” Wilson said.

Wilson doesn’t believe the dolphin approached the sperm whales for help in protecting itself from predators, since there aren’t many dolphin predators in the waters surrounding the Azores.

But Francis was not so quick to discount the idea. “I don’t buy that there is no predator in the lifelong experience of the whales and dolphins frequenting the Azores,” he said.

He suggested that it could be just as possible that the sperm whales accepted the dolphin for added protection against their own predators, like the killer whale(Orcinus orca), while traveling. “They see killer whales off the Azores, and while they may not be around regularly, it does not take a lot of encounters to make [other] whales defensive,” he said.”

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Discrimination:  The tendency for a behavior to occur in the presence of a certain stimuli but not in their absence.

“As trainers it is important to be very clear with our animals to prevent frustration. When giving hand signals to our animals they have to be able to discriminate between the signals. By discriminating they are then able to give the correct corresponding behavior. Each hand signal should be clear and different from the rest, thus decreasing the probability that the individual will mix up between behaviors.

Here at the aquarium our training staff utilizes a variety of hand signals with our collection. Our training staff works together to come up with new and inventive hand signals so that our collection can easily distinguish between which behaviors we are asking for. Each signal should be different but yet simple enough that every trainer is able to replicate it.

People and several species of animals have the capability to discriminate between different stimuli to produce different behaviors. This concept is not only applicable to the training world but also to everyday life. For example, you see some one smile and say hello to you. What do you do? In most cases you return the smile and greeting. What was the stimulus? The stimulus was the other person smiling and saying hello. What was the behavior given? The behavior was your return smile and greeting. People and animals are very observant creatures and its behavior is affected by different stimuli throughout everyday life.”